No matter how great the benefits sound, you may have struggled to maintain a meditation

practice,and never gotten yourself to really do it. I offer you a chance to investigate the topic

more deeply than you might do on your own, allowing us to devise an approach that is right for

you.

WHAT IS IT?

My psychological definition for the practice is the

psychophysiological capacity for mind-body integration.

My spiritual definition is the formal act of communing or

merging with God/Self.  My operational definition is any

activity that facilitates inner focus. It is usually, but not

always, performed sitting down.

WHY IS IT OFTEN DIFFICULT?

In many ways meditation is like swimming upstream—you’re

going

against the tide of life and human nature. Normal growth and development involves seeking

things outside. In meditation this is reversed—you go “within.” In general, the younger you are,

the more difficult it is to do (but it’s still worth doing), because younger people tend to be more

preoccupied with the world, and all the things it can teach them. Meditation can also “dry up”

for a variety of reasons, even if you’ve been practicing for years.

This is the most central and basic of all spiritual practices. Although a small number of better-

known meditation techniques are widely used, in theory everyone meditates slightly

differently, since we’re all unique in the precise way we all eventually return to God/Self. So if a

particular group, teaching or method has never quite grabbed you, or if the meditation you

have done has gotten old and left you more or less at loose ends, then you would likely benefit

from my approach. Together, we’ll assess the various personal and practical issues involved in

your search, and tailor a method of meditation specifically for you. With the right

understanding, anyone can value this practice and beneficially pursue it.

ISN’T IT NATURAL?

There are many approaches to, as well as types of, meditation, involving

breathing, mantras, visualization, movement and other means. Although it

is a potential faculty that everybody possesses, it is not automatic in the

way that sleeping is when you’re tired, or adrenaline is for danger. Although

most methods are quite simple, it must be taught, either personally or

through a book (which usually doesn’t work as well). In the same way that

you learned long ago to speak, you must learn to meditate.

Meditation  

is  

a  

bit  

like  

aerobic  

exercise,  

in  

that  

you  

have  

to  

exert  

a  

simple  

type

 

subtle  

effort  

for  

a  

period  

of  

time,  

in  

order  

to  

keep  

it  

going.  

Before  

aerobic  

exercise

made  

sense  

to  

you,  

however,  

you  

had  

to  

learn  

the  

value  

and  

benefit  

of  

continuing  

to  

apply

yourself  

in  

that  

way  

over  

a  

period  

of  

time.  

So,  

the  

technique  

behind  

aerobics  

is  

simply  

to  

“keep

trying” for that duration, to continue moving your body rapidly as you jog, swim, or whatever.

In  

meditation,  

the  

majority  

or  

techniques  

used  

are  

also  

very  

simple,  

but  

the  

territory

  

that  

you

cover  

in  

doing  

it,  

and  

the  

type  

of  

resistance

  

that  

you  

might  

encounter,  

is  

different  

than  

with

aerobics.  

The  

mental  

and  

physical  

resistance  

that  

you  

encounter  

when  

you  

jog  

or  

swim  

is

pretty  

much  

the  

same  

every  

time.  

Meditation,  

however,  

involves  

the  

mystery  

of  

that  

extremely

complex  

thing  

that  

we  

call  

the  

mind—both  

in  

and  

of  

itself  

,  

a  

well  

as  

how  

it  

relates  

to  

our

personal disposition and circumstances. Needless to say, this is different for everybody.

The effects of meditation are cumulative; there are innumerable studies attesting to its

benefits. It will get better over time in the same way that your maturity “gets better”

throughout life—in fact, it will enhance that maturity in ways it otherwise never would have

been, accomplishing and healing more and more things for you on personal and spiritual

levels, often in ways too subtle to directly appreciate. The body’s physical health is impacted as

well.

COUNSELING AND LEARNING PROCESS

You will learn meditation with me as part of a general counseling session of either 60 or 90

minutes (see practical specifics). This is necessary because I need to get to know you. I’ll need

to either start you off in a good way from scratch, or assess how you may be resisting a process

you are already familiar with (if it doesn’t need changing). To do this, I will need

information—not only your personal and spiritual philosophies, but also specifics relating to

your background, work, relationships, and so on. These things often impact our efforts to

meditate in ways that are not at all obvious. Once that’s done, we’ll figure out an approach that

is best for you, and meditate together to finish the session.

Future sessions, if any, may take place soon afterwards, or some weeks or months later, if you

feel you need help with your understanding and process of meditation. I like to recommend a

follow-up session in two weeks or a month, just to see how you’re doing and to answer any

questions you may have.

David Low MS, PhD

Meditation  

is  

easier  

than  

you  

think.  

It  

is

the   

art   

of   

mind-body   

integration,   

and

communing  

or  

merging  

with  

God/Self.  

It

is  

the  

most  

basic  

spiritual  

practice,  

and

no  

two  

people  

do  

it  

in  

exactly  

the  

same

way.  

Some  

people,  

actually,  

indeed  

“can’t

sit  

still”—which  

is  

why  

some  

meditation

methods   

involve   

not   

sitting   

down,   

but

standing and movement.

Meditation   

is   

a   

natural   

faculty,   

but   

it

doesn’t   

happen   

automatically   

like   

sleep

or  

adrenaline.  

You  

have  

to  

learn  

it,  

just  

as

you  

learned  

to  

talk.  

Even  

then,  

however,

success  

in  

meditation  

is  

more  

a  

matter  

of

attitude  

than  

of  

what  

you  

feel  

when  

you

sit down to do it.

The  

effects  

of  

meditation  

are  

cumulative

in   

enhancing   

your   

joy   

and   

maturity   

in

life.  

It  

impacts  

your  

health  

in  

a  

positive

way   

(although   

that   

is   

not   

the   

ultimate

reason  

people  

meditate).  

I  

have  

over  

40

years   

experience   

and   

am   

familiar   

with

Hindu,    

Buddhist,    

Christian,    

Sufi    

and

secular   

forms   

of   

this   

practice,   

and   

can

customize a method for you.